Special Olympics Basketball

Equipment

Crossbar Mat Pole Standards

Rules

Vaulters cannot use gloves or any gripping equipment other than chalk or rosin. All attempts begin with a sprint down the runway, towards the standards. As the vaulter approaches, the pole is lowered and placed in the box. As the pole bends, vaulters must lift their legs vertically. Vaulters may touch the crossbar, so long as it doesn't fall. The crossbar falling results in a failed attempt. Each vaulter is given two minutes to complete an attempt. The vaulter with the highest completed attempt at the end of competition is the winner.

Description

Pole Vault is an individual sport where participants use a long, flexible pole as an aid to leap over a horizontal bar. The person that jumps the bar at the highest levels wins. Once used by the Dutch to avoid getting wet, pole vaulting has evolved into a highly technical sport in the realm of track and field. Attempts at getting over the crossbar begin with a sprint down the runway. As the vaulter approaches, the pole is planted into the box and the vaulter is propelled upwards. Knocking the crossbar off the standards results in a failed attempt, as does taking more than 2 minutes to complete an attempt. At the end of competition, the vaulter with the highest completed attempt is the winner.

History

For hundreds of years, poles were used as a means of passing over natural obstacles in the Netherlands. Poles were also used by Venetian punters to move from boat to boat. Modern competitive pole vaulting began in Germany in the 1850's. Modern technique was developed in the United States at the end of the 19th century. The sport was featured as an event at the first modern Olympic Games in 1896. Today pole vaulting remains a popular sport in the world of track and field, with the highest level of competition found at the Summer Olympic Games.