Dambe (Hausa) Boxing

Equipment

Flying Discs

Rules

Double disc court Frisbee is played on two square courts, each measuring 13x13 meters. The courts are set 17 meters apart. Two, two-person teams stand in opposite squares and use discs to attack. Attacks are made by throwing a disc, and landing it in the opposing court, and/or by causing both discs to be touched by the opposing team at the same time, called a double. Points are scored when an attack is successful, or when a disc is thrown out of bounds. The first team to score a pre-determined amount of points is the winner.

Description

Double Disc Court Frisbee is a disc sport where two, two-player teams defend their side of the court from incoming discs, while at the same time, attacking the opposing side. Points are scored when discs land on the opposition's side. Double disc court Frisbee is a flying disc sport played on two large grass courts. Using two flying discs, opposing teams attack each other's court while defending their own. Attacks are made by landing a disc in the opposing court and/or causing both discs to be touched by the opposing team at the same time. Teams are rewarded for successful attacks with points. The first team to score a pre-determined amount of points is the winner.

History

Though many different stories exist that detail the origin of flying discs, the most commonly told story is that of the Frisbie Pie Company. According to legend, in the late 19th century the Frisbie Pie Company made pies that were sold to colleges across New England. Once finished, students would toss the empty pie tins around campus for sport and leisure. This practice caught on, and eventually led to the creation of plastic discs made specifically for throwing. Walter Frederick Morrison was a leading innovator, creating the Frisbee in 1948. The first formalized games using flying discs began in the 1960's and 1970's. The popularity of many of these sports, including double disc court Frisbee, was greatly enhanced by the extreme sports craze of the 1990's.