Bull Riding

Equipment

Boots Chaps Hats Lariat Vest

Rules

Calves are lined up in chutes with spring-loaded doors. When the door is closed a lightweight rope, attached to a trip lever, is fastened around the calf's neck. The lever holds a cord that runs across a pen where the horse and rider wait. This barrier is used to ensure that the calf gets a head start out of the chute. When the roper is ready, the cute is opened and the calf runs out in a straight line. When the calf reaches the end of the rope, the rope falls off, and the barrier for the horse is released. This starts the clocks and allows the rider to chase the calf. Riders must lasso the calf from horseback by throwing a lariat around the calf's neck. The rider then dismounts and ties three of the calf's legs together. When the tie is complete, the roper throws his hands in the air to stop the clock. The current world record is just over six seconds, but most top ropers will complete the task in seven seconds.

Description

Calf Roping is a rodeo sport where mounted riders chase a calf and attempt to throw a rope around its neck. Once completed, the rider dismounts and ties its legs together. The rider with the quickest time of completion is the winner. Calf roping began in the late 19th century as part of a competition to see who was the best ranch hand. Today it's a popular rodeo sport throughout the much of North America. Competition consists of a rider chasing after a calf and roping it. The rider then dismounts and ties three of the calf's legs. The rider with the quickest time of completion is the winner.

History

Calf roping is said to have begun in 1869 when two groups of cowboys met in Colorado to settle a dispute over which group was best a general ranch tasks. In 1936 the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) was created to serve as an organizing body for all competitive rodeos in the United States. Today many competitions are held throughout the United States and Canada.